About Me

I am a writer, environmental designer and community ecologist, based in Vancouver, Canada.

My aim is to make the world greener and better. I work with people, groups and governments to improve the environment, and I write about things that matter, or should, or don’t but seem funny anyway.

You can click here to buy my novels or non-fiction books, including the latest which became — gasp — a BC #1 Bestseller.

I have an undergraduate degree in Politics and a masters degree in Landscape Architecture. I used the systems analyses and design skills I learned in school to create my company EcoUrbanist. It offers ecological site design, environmental consultation/reporting and project management for diverse clients from individuals to city governments.

I am the founding Executive Director of Tree City, a non-profit environmental group “helping people and trees grow together.” We helped Vancouver early on with one of its key Greenest City goals by creating the TreeKeepers program which added nearly 9,000 trees to our urban forest.

I also teach because, as with writing, it helps me figure out what I know. I have designed and lead a variety of courses for Simon Fraser University’s Continuing Studies program. I also teach online for Gaia College where my most recent course on Living Green Infrastructure was all about urban design using nature.

I am a keynote speaker and have given presentations across Canada, the U.S., Europe and Asia. I also pop up on radio, most recently talking about trees for CBC. You can click here for some sample clips.

Volunteers are my favourite people. At times I’ve been lucky to be one myself. I served as an elected member of the Vancouver Food Policy Council for four years, and represented Vancouver on the Metro Vancouver Agricultural Advisory Committee for three years. I also served for three years on the Board of Directors for Heifer International, a non-profit working to “end hunger and poverty and care for the Earth” in more than 50 countries.

  • Vancouver's tree champion.

    Lynda Steele – CKNW Radio
  • [In The Miracle Tree] meet the engaging characters in the town of Fraelton. You'll laugh with them and at them. And love them. The romance will have you sighing and feeling melancholy. And you haven't met the Miracle Tree yet. It will change your way of thinking for the better. At the end of the book there is a big surprise that is totally unimaginable. It had me going to my computer to look up the town of Fraelton. I think I would like to live in a town like that with people like that.

    Amazon reader review
  • Tracey takes urban agriculture beyond just an idea and presents a lifestyle. Tracey’s excitement and passion for urban agriculture is evident in this book. The commentary was personable and the anecdotes give the book better context. It is refreshing to not only read about the importance of urban agriculture but also realistic opportunities to participate in this “food revolution".

    Amazon reader review
  • [The Mustard Seed] reminded me of a Phillip Marlowe film noir, with the main character acting like him in films, finding him to be weak and flawed but coming through in the end. Bits of Buddhism a nice touch. I could see it as a film. Four star.

    Amazon reader review
  • [Guerrilla Gardening is a] fantastic book. Weaves ecology and politics together and has a load of fun doing it. I laughed more times reading this book than I can remember. But most of all it's inspiring. We can change the screwed-up world one seed at a time. Now I'm a guerrilla gardening too and I can hardly wait to plant something.”

    Goodreads reader review
  • This gem of book not only shares a wide range of information, scientifically and culturally, about each tree described, it also tells stories...intimate stories, of trees and the neighbourhoods they live in. I highly recommend this treasure of tree knowledge and Vancouver lore, all shared through the wonderful sentients of this city. Thank you David Tracey for your dedication in the research of trees and their individual traits, and for useful information about what each one contributes to our city and our world.    

    From the Foreword – Cease Wyss T’Uy’Tanat
  • [The Earth Manifesto is] a deceptively small book (132 pages), which is much bigger on the inside…Engaged Ecology is what Ecopsychology should be about – local, personal, and reflective, but also global, communitarian, and active.

    Ecopsychology.org review
  • [The Earth Manifesto took] only two hours start to finish... and I absolutely loved it. Very clearly articulated arguments back up a reasonable and inspirational ‘everyman’s plan of action.’ Knows when to use strong language without bitterness. Stop being a victim and start fighting back, and read with an open mind.

    Goodreads.com review
  • David Tracey’s Urban Agriculture is a road map to food security, to our reconnecting to the soil and the earth, even in cities, and to reclaiming our humanity as cultivators of community while we cultivate food.

    Dr. Vandana Shiva scientist, environmental activist
  • [Urban Agriculture] is an antidote to despair.

    Rebecca Alexander – University of Washington Botanical Gardens Elisabeth C. Miller Library
  • Tracey takes urban agriculture beyond just an idea and presents a lifestyle. Tracey’s excitement and passion for urban agriculture is evident in this book. The commentary was personable and the anecdotes give the book better context. It is refreshing to not only read about the importance of urban agriculture but also realistic opportunities to participate in this “food revolution.”

    Amazon reader review
  • Guerrilla Gardening is an awesome book for those already interested in beautifying the urban landscape but also a good book to give to friends, especially if you want to plant a seed in someone’s head.

    Erin Kobayashi – Broken Pencil Magazine
  • [Guerrilla Gardening is a] fantastic book. Weaves ecology and politics together and has a load of fun doing it. I laughed more times reading this book than I can remember. But most of all it's inspiring. We can change the screwed-up world one seed at a time. Now I'm a guerrilla gardening too and I can hardly wait to plant something.

    Goodreads reader review
  • [Guerrilla Gardening] is full of great quotes, sidebars, lists and tips. Enough to keep the most ADD of us interested and inspired. I see urban landscapes and abandoned places in a whole new light when I can imagine them becoming life-giving gardens.

    Lucas Land – Sustainable Traditions
  • [In The Miracle Tree] meet the engaging characters in the town of Fraelton. You'll laugh with them and at them. And love them. The romance will have you sighing and feeling melancholy. And you haven't met the Miracle Tree yet. It will change your way of thinking for the better. At the end of the book there is a big surprise that is totally unimaginable. It had me going to my computer to look up the town of Fraelton. I think I would like to live in a town like that with people like that.

    Amazon reader review
  • [The Mustard Seed] reminded me of a Phillip Marlowe film noir, with the main character acting like him in films, finding him to be weak and flawed but coming through in the end. Bits of Buddhism a nice touch. I could see it as a film. Four star.

    Amazon reader review
  • I would like to voice my gratitude for the role you played in helping this project come to fruition. You were a kind of glue which tied us all together. I appreciated the flexibility you showed in working with the various obstacles and changes which happened throughout.

    Jim Leyden – Little Black Bear Warrior
  • The garden is beautiful – even yesterday [a resident] told me that he found the space so breath taking and peaceful.  He said there was no space like this in the DTES.  He plans on using the garden more often to meditate and bring peace to his every growing anxiety.

    Sandy MacKeigan – Community Programmer
  • You have been remarkable in your patience and openness to go with all of the delays and bureaucratic red tape that surrounded this project. It has been more than worth it for the community and I hope you know that we really needed you and your expertise or it still would not be complete.

    Ethel Whitty – Carnegie Centre Director
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